Prime Rib And Potato Tots

There are multiple benefits from cooking meat sous vide. Simply put, food is placed in a bag and the air is taken out, typically using a vacuum machine. The food is then placed in a container of moving water that is being controlled by an immersion circulator that keeps the water at an exact temperature.. Basically, a super precise Jacuzzi for food.

In this case, with having control of the exact temperature, we are able to cook this beef rib more accurately than the traditional roasting method that tends to cook this cut of meat unevenly.

We like to finish ours by applying a simple steak rub, and searing it on a super hot grill for extra flavor.

Want to cook a prime rib that is pink end to end?

Continue to read on as we discuss the secrets for a mouth watering piece of bovine.

Prime Rib And Potato Tots

Ingredients

  • 3 - 4lbs. prime rib of beef
  • 5 eggs
  • 4 oz. butter
  • 7 yukon gold potatoes
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 cups parmesan reggiano cheese
  • 1 bunch thyme
  • 1 bunch chives
  • garlic
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • duck fat
  • AP flour
  • SPICE RUB:
  • espelette pepper
  • chili powder
  • garlic powder
  • brown sugar
  • ground black pepper
  • smoked paprika
  • diamond kosher salt

Instructions

  1. Step 1: prep the beef
  2. Step 2: cook the beef
  3. Step 3: make the rub
  4. Step 4: make the tot batter
  5. Step 5: prep the grill
  6. Step 6: cook the tots
  7. Step 7: Grill the beef and slice
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Prime Rib And Potato Tots Step 1: | Prep The Beef

We bag this cut of beef using a Minipack MVS 31x vacuum machine and 3 mil vacuum bags. 

These machines can get expensive, but they are well worth it for other applications, which we will be discussing throughout this blog.

However, you can jimmy rig this recipe using a food saver for sealing the beef with just the thyme, bay leaf, and garlic and buying a fairly cheap anova imersion circulator as opposed to a more expensive one from Polyscience.

$265 for a circulator and food saver is a steal compared to the equipment we used, which runs upward of 4k.

If using a food saver, make sure not to add the olive oil as they don’t work well with liquids, oils, marinades, etc.

Using gloves, place the meat in the bag with thyme, bay leaf, crushed garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and seal on max pressure.

Bagging prime rib for sous vide cooking

bagging prime rib with aromatics and extra virgin olive oil

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cryovac prime rib in minipack mvs 31x

prepped prime rib for sous vide cooking

Prime Rib And Potato Tots Step 2: | Cook The Beef

One of the benefits from cooking meat sous vide is that it’s really hard to over cook it.

Cooking meat sous vide at low temperatures allows us to have more control over the finished product as compared to traditional cooking methods like roasting, in which you cook a piece of meat at a much higher temperature than the internal temp needs to be. Therefore when roasting, the outside is well overcooked by the time the center is cooked correctly.

Sous vide cooking takes out all of the guesswork, and if done correctly, is consistent every time.

We cooked this beef rib at 136° F for just over 4 hours.

cooking prime rib at 136 degrees

Note: You can cook this at a higher temp with lower time, or a lower temp with more time. Just remember as a rule of thumb that reaction rates roughly double with every 15° F rise.

Prime Rib And Potato Tots Step 3 : | Make The Rub

Measure all of the ingredients separately.

individual spices for spice rub

Mix until fully incorporated.

mixing spices for spice rub

Spice Rub Recipe:

1/2 tsp. espelette pepper

1/2 tsp. garlic powder

1/2 tsp. chili powder

1/2 tsp. smoked paprika

1 tbs. brown sugar

1 tbs. ground black pepper

1 tbs diamond kosher salt

Prime Rib And Potato Tots Step 4: | Make The Potato Tot Batter

In order to make these tots puffy, light, and crispy, we need to make a pate choux. (This is the same stuff that eclairs are made from) We then mix the pate choux with eggs, milled potatoes, parmesan cheese, and fry them in duck fat until golden brown and awesome.

To start, place the yukon gold potatoes on salt and into a preheated 350° F oven.

yukon gold potatoes on kosher salt ready for the oven

Cook until tender and a cake tester is easily inserted.

cooked yukon gold potatoes and cake tester

Once fully cooked, scoop out the potato into a food mill.

scooping the potatoes into a food mill

Mill the potatoes and let cool to room temperature.

milling the potatoes

Next, bring the milk, water, and butter to a boil.

milk, water, and butter coming to a boil

Once it boils, stir in the flour and cook on medium heat until the pate choux pulls away from the pan, and cool to room temperature.

cooking pate choux on medium heat

Using a stand mixer, whisk the pate choux until it starts to crumble and add one egg at a time until fully incorporated.adding one egg at a time to the stand mixer

Next, add the milled potatoes, parmesan, and season liberally with salt and pepper.

adding the milled potatoes

adding the parmesan cheese

adding the salt and pepper

Mix until fully incorporated.

fully incorporated potato tot batter

Cover batter with plastic wrap until ready to cook.

batter covered with plastic wrap

Potato Tots Recipe:

1  1/2 cups water

1/2 cup whole milk

2 cups AP flour

4 oz. butter

4 whole eggs

1 egg yolk

3 cups milled yukon gold potatoes

2 cups parmesan reggiano

Prime Rib And Potato Tots Step 5: | Cook The Potato Tots

Potatoes in duck fat are dynamite however you decide to cook them. We cook ours in duck fat using a preheated  breville smart fryer at 350°F.

This epic duck fat is delicious and we just so happen to love the name! You can check out their other products here.

epic duck fat and breville smart fryer

Using a spoon and your index finger, scoop a small amount of batter and carefully place into the fryer.

carefully placing the batter into the fryer

frying the batter

Fry until golden brown all over.

frying until golden brown all over

golden brown potato tots

opened potato tots

Note: Make sure to move quickly when frying so all of the potato tots are cooked evenly, and finish with sea salt and chives.

Prime Rib And Potato Tots Step 6: | Grill The Beef And Slice

Once the beef has cooked in the water bath for 4 hours, remove the meat from the bag and discard the juice, herbs, and garlic. Then dry thoroughly with paper towels.

sous vide prime rib after being dried with paper towels

Once the meat is dry, season it aggressively with the rub.

prime rib seasoned with spice rub

Next, grill the beef rib whole on all sides. Try to get as much color on the beef without burning it.

grilling the beef

cooking the beef on all sides

cooking the beef on another side

Next using a knife, remove the bones, and sear both the bones and underside of the rib eye for extra caramelization, smoke, and flavor.

searing the bones and underside of the ribeye

Remove from the grill, slice and serve.

Note: We only grill the beef for flavor, we are not trying to cook it anymore as it is already pink from end to end after it comes out of the water bath. Because we cooked the meat sous vide, we don’t have to let the beef rest and come back down in temperature like you would a roast. You can slice this larger cut of beef as soon as it comes off the grill.

Conclusion

Sous vide cooking has become overly trendy and over used. However, when done correctly it allows you to achieve results that no other cooking methods can.

Equilibrium cooking is setting the cooking temperature at just above the target core temperature, and allowing the food to come into equilibrium with the bath temperature. (Rule of thumb is roughly 2°F higher).  In this case we were aiming for core temp of 134°F, and we believe this is the simplest approach to cooking sous vide.

There are a few things to remember for cooking meat. Always cook red meat between 131°F and 143°F.

Anything over 143°F and the albumin, which is responsible for the red color, will start to cook and the meat will turn grey and start to dry out.

Don’t cook meat under 125° F because of the lack of pasteurization.

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Stop by next week when we show you how to make a very simple salad of wax beans that we served with this epic prime rib.

Thanks for stopping by epic food blog!